Get the Hell Out of Dodge – Meaning, Origin and Usage

Did someone just tell you to “get the hell out of dodge?” What does it mean? Let’s unpack everything you need to know about the origin and meaning of this idiom.

Get the Hell out of Dodge Meaning

If you’re telling people to get the hell out of dodge, you’re asking them to leave you alone or get out of your house. If you’re telling yourself and your friends to get the hell out of dodge, you’re telling everyone that you need to gather your things and leave the area right now.

To “get the hell out of dodge” comes from early western movies, and it’s a popular saying that’s still in use today. Getting the hell out of dodge can refer to other people, yourself, or the people you are with. Typically, you’ll be using it in a lighthearted manner, but there are occasions when you can use it as a stern warning to others.

Get the Hell out of Dodge Example Usage

“Ok, guys, it’s time to get the hell out of dodge before we press our luck and lose everything we made at the tables tonight.”

“I recommend you people get the hell out of dodge before the cops get here and everyone gets arrested for trespassing.”

“Let’s get the hell out of dodge; the cops are probably on the way after that old man reported the fire.”

“This place is terrible; it takes 30-minutes to get a drink. Let’s get the hell out of dodge and go somewhere else.”

“The whole town is burning down. Let’s get the hell out of dodge and find somewhere to escape the fire.”

Get the Hell out of Dodge Origin

The phrase “get the hell, out of dodge” comes from Hollywood western films in the early 20th century. During the western era, “Dodge City” was a location in Kansas and a recurring theme in western tales. Many westerns featured the town sheriff telling the bandits in the story to “get the hell out of Dodge” and take their criminal activities elsewhere.

Later generations changed the phrase’s original meaning into an idiom, using it to describe fleeing from a location. The saying spread across America in the early 1900s, and as slang entered English, it morphed into the term, “get the hell outta Dodge,” and that rendition of the phrase is around today.

The Urban Dictionary classified the term in 2005. The phrase is still common today but in its more adapted format of “outta” instead of “out of.” It’s also more common for young people to say, “let’s blow this joint.”

Phrases Similar to Get the Hell out of Dodge

  • Let’s blow this joint.
  • Let’s book it.
  • Let’s bounce.
  • Let’s move it.

Phrases Opposite to Get the Hell out of Dodge

  • Stay awhile.
  • Don’t go anywhere.

What is the Correct Saying?

  • Get the hell out of dodge.
  • Get the hell outta dodge.

Ways People May Say Get the Hell out of Dodge Incorrectly

The word “Dodge” in the phrase doesn’t refer to “Dogecoin,” the cryptocurrency. However, several memes were floating around when dogecoin crashed in mid to late 2021. Using it in forums and chats would be funny if you’re telling people to abandon the digital asset. However, the more common use of the phrase is for telling people to leave an establishment.

Acceptable Ways to Phrase Get the Hell out of Dodge

You can use “get the hell out of dodge” when impressing on other people that you need to leave somewhere quickly. You can also use the phrase when telling other people to leave a property. The term typically has a negative connotation, but you can use it in various situations, from heated and tense exchanges to a common comment when leaving a diner.

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